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FEATURES/Person of the Year '09 | Dec 23, 2009 | 15063 views

The Teller of Stories

He was succeeding as a banker and was pretty much in line for a BMW. But one day, Chetan Bhagat decided to write more than just the ledger account

I

n mid-2003, in a bar called The Bull and The Bear, in the financial district of Hongkong, Chetan Bhagat stared at the three tequila shots he’d ordered. He was miserable, messed up.
It wasn’t supposed to be this way.

He’d lived the dream. He’s started modestly: army kid, not much money in the family, strict upbringing, the kind where even television was frowned upon. His kid brother and he would make up stories for each other to amuse themselves. Well, okay, ‘strict’ was a euphemism: he says now he’d call it ‘almost oppressive.’ Plus his parents didn’t get along, so there were frequent tense periods. But, he adds, there was frequent laughter too; his mother could make people laugh, and he credits his sense of humour to her. (He also goes on to point out that all his stories have involved screwed up families; “I don’t know any other kind.”)

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Getting a seat in an IIT was his ticket out. It was the place where he really started looking around, finding himself, observing people. His batchmates, he recalls, all seemed lost: “They didn’t want to be here, they were all escaping, they didn’t know who they were.” He got involved with theatre, wrote plays.

When it came to taking a summer project, he didn’t want to do “anything hardcore.” There was a placement at Cadburys that no one else wanted, and he leapt at it: “Two months in Lonavala! Chocolates!” His project, to fix a wrapping machine that was supposed to do 250 chocolate lollipops a minute, but was only doing 75. He puzzled over it, but didn’t crack it.

One night, he bumped into the foreman, a veteran of the place. Rather than go eat alone in the executive canteen, he went along with him to the worker’s canteen. They talked for three hours, about the man’s life, his children, his struggles. The next day, the wrapping machine was miraculously performing at full capacity. The foreman told him that he’d worked there ten years, he knew the machine inside-out. Until then, “No one heard me. You did. I had to make your project successful.”

That was Bhagat’s epiphany. No more machines, he decided, it would be people from now on. So, when he graduated from IIT, he decided to do an MBA, at IIM Ahmedabad. After which he’d work abroad, China for choice. “I thought it would be better to see what India would be like in ten years, then come back.”

He got a job in Hongkong, with Peregrine. That office folded in six months, a victim of the financial crisis, and he moved to Goldman Sachs. So far, so good.

But he was sure his boss hated him; the man seemed to think that Bhagat should have been glad to have a job, given the environment. He certainly didn’t have a good word to say about his work, his leadership qualities, heck, even his haircut.

He’d been working on a book — frequently during office hours, in a sort of I’ll-show-him kind of way —about life in IIT. He’d been sending it to publishers back in India, but had collected a pretty comprehensive set of rejection letters. Publishers asked questions like would this sell abroad, is it going to get a big foreign advance? And the answer was — rightly, he says now — no. With each rejection, he’d gone back to the story; he edited, did complete rewrites, trying to build in literary flourishes, make it more descriptive, colourful, attractive to agents, whatever.

And now he’d just heard that another publisher didn’t want the book.

He stared at the tequilas. That was rejection number eight.

He downed the tequilas. All three of them. He took some mints for his breath, and went back to the office, and somehow made it through the day. He asked himself what he was doing: he was supposed to be writing because he loved it, this book was supposed to be the raised middle finger to his boss. Instead, he was turning into an alcoholic, and, worse, that bastard would be proved right; he was really a failure.

Fortunately for him, a short while down the line, a little ray of sunshine peeped through the gloom.
Kapish Mehra, the son of the owner of Rupa & Co, was just getting into the family business. And he liked the book. He persuaded his father to take it on.

This was a time when a novel published in India would need to sell around 1000 copies for the publisher to break even. (For Indian writing in English at that time, 2000 sold would make the book a bestseller.) Bhagat said that thanks to IIT and IIM, he had around 200 people he could count on to buy copies. But Rupa was dubious, unsure it could sell the other 800.

Nevertheless, they bought the book. Bhagat worked on it some more; took out the flourishes — “I realised I can’t be Arundhathi Roy” — brought back more of the humour he was comfortable with — putting in “more Chetan” — and the book, Five Point Someone, went to press with a rather adventurous 4000-copy run.

It sold out in a day, says Kapish Mehra. Surprisingly though, it wasn’t hailed as a smash hit; and it got mixed reviews. But it did well enough to give Bhagat the chance to write another.

It was only when that second book, One Night @ the Call Center, came out, he says, that people seemed to suddenly recall that they’d read Five Point Someone.

This article appeared in the Forbes India magazine issue of 08 January, 2010
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Comments (16)
Manohar Patil Nov 13, 2012
need the magazin page number of this article -The Teller of Stories by Peiter Griffin
abhishek anand Dec 23, 2009
Chetan's creations are awesome and i need not to mention it . But for me his best book will always be 5pointsomeone
SV Dec 23, 2009
Great Writer. Check out www.ucsdakdphi,org for the review of his latest book - 2 States.
Shantu Dec 23, 2009
Loved fivepointsomeone so damn much that I am still in its hangover. I read the book some four years back and now though none of the other books of yours captivated me like the earlier one, i still look forward to new ones. Anyway, after reading all your books i find only 5pointsomeone close to my heart but nevertheless your writings amuse me and inspire me more than ever. Chetan, you have carved a new path and have shown light to the people who dare to think and go beyond inspite of their shortcomings and incapabilities .

Today, you are one of the most celebrated writers in India and easily a youth icon..all because you thought and you did.

Kudos !
srikanth Dec 23, 2009
Well written duude ,, check if chetan has an apprentice slot free, may be you can give him VFM :) and yeah waiting for the next one,, more than that, the long awaited 3 idiots
Sudeep Dec 23, 2009
I like to read Chetan's books. The way he presents the young life and thoughts are awesome. I believe going forward he will be the most achieved English writer in India.



Keep Rockin Chetan...
Nithin ankam Dec 23, 2009
I just love the way he does things. He just listens to his heart huh!!! His books are written in very simple English. They have all the Flavours which a common man dreams of, may be that is the thing which people like in his books. His latest 2-States is a simple one track story with some touching moments. I just loved it:) Cheers Mr Bhagat looking forward for more Good books from you.
Deepa KV Dec 23, 2009
Love you Chetan and we are more than the 'hate you's!
Suvendu Rout Dec 23, 2009
I love this writer's approach to writing...the beautiful and cheerful way of story telling. I have read all his books and almost become a fan of his. His truthfulness comes out clearly in his writing. I love his candidness and modesty.
@mey Dec 23, 2009
Lovely article.. recently read another article by Chetan Bhagat here.. its was awesome and completely blow me away...

http://coolemails.wordpress.com/2008/08/26/keep-the-spark-alive-by-chetan-bhagat
ashish agrawal Dec 23, 2009
always been a huge admirer of chetan bhagat. Have tried to read all his interviews and article since 2005. This one is among the best written on him.

He is one of my idol. a person whom i truly admire. Someone i wud like to be like.

i have no qualms in saying that he taught me how to read and thru his books i have made read another 50 people.

pls continue ur good work. pls bring the change.
naveen_g Dec 23, 2009
Wouldn’t politics be a natural next step? He considers this. “It would be frustrating. Too much sucking up needed. I want action.” Pause. “But maybe ten years later.” Pause. “Maybe five.” - i hope it was a joke ;)
Kalpesh Ajugia Dec 23, 2009
I have read, 5 point someone
Sowmiya Dec 23, 2009
I love this interview.. not just because Chetan is my favorite author... Beyond that.... His life.. Inspirational... Chetan, I liked one particular thing very much... "Negativity brings me down so I chose to please people who love me".This is a perfect lesson for a pessimist like me .. I'll never give chance to people to call me a pessimist.. I am an optimist :) Loved your interview.. THUMBS UP :)
karan Dec 23, 2009
Now Chetan should write a complete autobiography. I am An ardent fan of him.....he is awesome and books are something with which lot of indian youth connect themselves....cheers Chetan...
vijayant Dec 23, 2009
amazing post every human has a story, even the storytellers :)
looking forward to the tweeterview :)
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