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UpFront/Breakpoint | Apr 9, 2012 | 10780 views

How Open Source Drug Discovery Is Helping India Develop New Drugs

Left to fend for itself, India is now finally developing new drugs on its own
How Open Source Drug Discovery Is Helping India Develop New Drugs
Image: Mallikarjun Katakol for Forbes India
OPTMISTIC T Balganesh, the chief of the OSDD drug development unit, is looking for a big shift in the drug discovery process

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rowdsourcing can boast of many success stories today, but in 2008, when the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) launched such an effort for drug discovery, there weren’t many. Four years on, its Open Source Drug Discovery (OSDD) network is emerging as a cyber platform to garner resources for developing drugs that pharmaceutical companies don’t find attractive enough.

On World TB Day on March 24, when OSDD and the Global Alliance on TB (GATB) in New York announced that a new TB molecule will undergo Phase IIb trial in India, even as it is being tested in Brazil and Africa, it was a sign of serious commitment from CSIR. If the molecule shows promise, it can advance into further studies and be included in treatment more quickly. India detects 1.7 million new cases of TB every year.

“Realistically speaking, open innovation is the future of drug development,” says Samir Brahmachari, director general, CSIR. He got OSDD off the ground with a seed fund of Rs 50 crore in September 2008 and has sought Rs 1,700 crore in the 12th Plan. “I am sure even with the revised economic growth rate, we’ll get Rs 800-1,000 crore,” he says.

Hopefully, the funds will arrive soon. CSIR is yet to spend its seed money since substantial free help poured in during the initial phase, including assistance from Infosys to build the portal. But it’s the human capital that Brahmachari and the heads of six business units of OSDD are more preoccupied with. There’s limited drug development expertise in the industry, let alone research institutions. In December 2011, in one of the five newly created posts, CSIR appointed T Balganesh, former head of R&D and managing director of AstraZeneca India, as the chief of the OSDD drug development unit.

Now the programme is set to steamroll. With the GATB molecule, there will be immense learning for India in the next 12-16 months, says Balganesh. Having spent 25 years in AstraZeneca, he knows how drugs are developed, but more importantly, he has seen first-hand how the big pharma model of drug discovery has been falling apart. He says he is convinced that if India has to have drugs for neglected diseases, it has to develop them on its own. China has moved on similar lines, investing over $500 million in domestic programmes.

As a mentor for all CSIR drug discovery efforts, Balganesh is positioning OSDD as the de facto “application” platform for the country. “We need to break away from the big pharma mould and try risky routes… look for a big shift in the discovery process,” he says.

If OSDD participants manage to develop a molecule to reduce sputum bacteria, even in a week’s time it will have enormous public health benefit. Then, in another big shift, the drug could be delivered through aerosols, like asthma inhalers. “This may not cure the disease, but it will impact the public health system. I am asking people to come up with novel ways of hitting the [TB] bacteria,” says Balganesh.

So far, the network has crowd-pulled some 5,500 participants in 130 countries, 80 percent of whom are in India. From the “healthy-looking front end”, two anti-TB molecules are in advance stages of research, though they are still two to three years away from clinical study. The malaria and Leishmaniasis programmes have just taken off. However, it’s the late stage research that needs strengthening where molecules, proverbially, die like flies.

It’s for this purpose that an innovation centre is being built in Mumbai. It will do pre-clinical work, says Ram Vishwakarma, director of the Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine (IIIM) in Jammu. His institute developed, in partnership with Cadila Pharmaceuticals, a new combination drug for TB in 2009. With the antibiotic rifampicin dose almost halved, the new drug risorin is much safer.

mg_64766_indigenous_cure_280x210.jpg

Vishwakarma, who was earlier with Piramal Life Sciences in Mumbai, is now using OSDD to file an Investigational New Drug application with the US Food and Drug Administration so that risorin could be taken to other markets. “I am driving such programmes as it would be driven in the industry—even outsourcing to contract research organisations,” he says.

Meanwhile, Balganesh wants to groom OSDD as an institution which life sciences companies can effectively use to drive common goals such as biomedical breakthroughs. All this would require more than just capital investment. Researchers today file patents only to be able to publish. They often don’t use the 18 months that it takes for the patent application to become public for bulwarking their patent. Consequently, the patents remain weak and unfit for commercialisation, a reason why companies don’t make a beeline to commercialise them. Balganesh and Vishawakarma believe this hole can be plugged with OSDD resources.

In drug research, the network effect is multiplying (see graphic). The medicines of the future will come from innovation networks which will comprise of numerous stakeholders, says Kenneth Kaitin, professor and director, Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston.

“Although India may currently lack the infrastructure for moving forward with some of these open source initiatives, I think the brain power and commitment are there, and I have no doubts that OSDD will not only succeed in India, but will eventually flourish,” he says.

This article appeared in the Forbes India magazine of 13 April, 2012
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Comments (30)
Pushpdeep Apr 15, 2012
The Open initiative stands apart unlike the profit driven research by the private pharma companies, as Open Community works for a cause. OSDD has come up strongly in the competition and shall rise up ahead as the community grows bigger and bigger, and so is the determination of its community members to solve the challenges in the society. To make the Impossible, Possible!
Pushpdeep Mishra
Researcher, OSDD.
Pushpdeep Apr 15, 2012
Today the World appreciates the Open Science and Open innovation. Scientists say that the bigger and complex problems can be solved through Open Science and research. Open Source Drug Discovery is aimed to do the same. Working for OSDD gives opportunity for young minds to give their intellectual inputs under the esteemed guidance of expert and experienced Principle investigators. The Step taken by Govt of India for Open research has been very successful so far and with more funds coming in, the positivity to achieve its goal has immensely rose.
At OSDD the goal of the researchers is to work towards new drug for the tropically neglected diseases. Collaborators work day and night, not for any monetary benefits, but to save those thousands of patients who die daily due to Tuberculosis and other tropically neglected diseases which largely affects the poor. Open Science says to contribute as much as one wants for the open research. There are no time limitations; one can work for as less as for few minutes to as long as many hours together. Several Collaborators in the community have used the power of social media, open tools
Rakhila Nair Apr 15, 2012
Really a an inspiring thoughts thanks to Seema

I am a house wife doing research at home by the help of osdd women science forum . For an educated girl student in india , how we will satisfy our passion toward science while doing our duties as a mother and wife ( forget the elite class) . for the students like me osdd is a great relief . otherwise i might have stopped my learning after Msc .



rakhila

research scholar

Bharathiyar University coimbatore TN
Mobsar Ali Apr 15, 2012
Dear Friends,

Finance and health are not the basic problems in research, Research's pillars are attitude, resources and epistemology. The purpose of the research is to produce new knowledge, rather than to present the existing knowledge in a new form.

There are lot scientist who are getting enough financial assurance but still they are nil in research. Those kinds of researchers are just publishing papers without sense to show that they are doing research.
So if we'll consider financial problem a basic one then we can earn from research but we can'€™t do research.
Similar case is with health, health is also not a barrier for research, we have a best example Stephen Hawking and several more, those are not having good health but their contributions to society is unforgettable.

The basic thing we need are first to change our attitude for research, and get all resources......

Mobsar Ali
OSDD
Rajasthan
Nufail Vkd Apr 14, 2012
another link from osdd which explain the right of a contributor

http://scienceopenscience.blogspot.in/p/use-of-osdd-resources-terms.html

for osdd team

nufail vkd
OSDD research@home
Vr Suresh Apr 11, 2012
It is true that pharma companies headquartered in (Western) foreign countries, naturally, worry about keeping THEIR investors happy by focusing on diseases that affect THEIR population. As is usually the case with Indians, Indian pharma also tends to focus its presentations on unmet medical needs of the West and presents statistics and pie charts on the incidence of diseases relevant to the West as a rationale for its programs. So from that point of view, there is no reason why we should not wake up and start taking care of ourselves. If the West doesn't care about malaria and TB, why shouldn't we embark on our research programs to help ourselves?

But although it sounds nice on paper and in cyberspace, it's never this simple. Transparency and accountability are not intrinsic traits of Indian society. Dr. Brahmachari has run into such problems himself--if I have to cite a case, I would cite the one about Dr. Shiva Ayyadurai who was fired for criticizing CSIR policies. Of course, Ayyadurai's problem is not an uncommon one--most NRIs get carried away with their own self-importance when Indian agencies woo them to join them and forget the way India works (and doesn't work) and try to rock the boat as soon as they come in.

And falling into a tearful embrace when one's employer has admitted their faults after a quarrel because one pointed out their flaws while one was getting paid by them is something the film industry may like but it doesn't work in real life. But my point is that open-ness is not really open-ness and there are real-world problems with this idea of "sharing all resources."

I am not clear on what is meant by patenting being weak and the part about grooming OSDD as an institution which life sciences companies can use to drive common goals. Life sciences companies are usually enterprises that have to answer to investors. They have to turn in profits and give returns to those who invested in their efforts.

Patenting is important to companies because it protects their intellectual property and allows them to recover the expenditure of effort, time and money by not allowing competitors to take up their invention (product/process/use) and make money out of it as soon as they release it into the market after all that hard work. OSDD, on the other hand, says that it is patent-neutral and wants to keep information and other resources open for all to use. Inherently, these two concepts (patenting by companies and OSDD) are contradictory. What do these people really want?

TS Balganesh was in Astrazeneca痴 R&D for quite a while. While it is prudent to take the help of experienced people to further research and innovation, I don稚 see the sort of entrepreneurship that some people show by quitting a company when they have put in enough years learning the ropes, starting their own company to do something different, maybe sell that company when it does well, move on and help others mushroom so that many people are benefitted by the experience of this entrepreneur and knowledge is spread. So I could believe Dr. Balganesh痴 interest in furthering drug discovery and development in India if he had quit years before retirement to do this work with OSDD because he wanted to implement his own ideas. Is this the case or did he retire from Astrazeneca and like all people in India over the age of 60 years get a new lease of employment?

As for Dr. Kenneth Kaitin痴 closing remarks on India lacking the infrastructure for moving forward with some of these open source initiatives and claiming to think that the 澱rain power and commitment are there, and I have no doubts that OSDD will not only succeed in India, but will eventually flourish. Most Western scientists who are willing to talk about this will tell you that an idea that sits on the fence about intellectual property protection (supporting it for companies but encouraging open access for others) is not one that will benefit the people who put effort into such an initiative. Infrastructure will come up, equipment will also be purchased, but brain power and commitment to do research will not stay for long in India after they either fly in from abroad or pass out of Indian universities. But like Indian institutions, OSDD itself may succeed and flourish葉he question is will the taxpayers who pay for such initiatives benefit and flourish from such an initiative?
Response to Vr Suresh:
Seema Singh Apr 12, 2012
@VR Suresh: "Patenting is weak" - this means that for researchers, ticking the patent box in their check list (maybe that's an internal CSIR process, I am not sure) is a way forward to publishing 'coz they are largely evaluated on publications. In the time that a patent is filed and the application becomes public, good researchers worldwide strengthen it with good science or else it could be broken in no time. Since that doesn't happen here, companies, even though a handful, don't come forward to invest in them. That's the bane of CSIR, which until very recently was investing more in patenting than earning from it. Now it's become selective in filing patents. (There's data to prove this.)

You are right about accountability and transparency. But getting GATB and other international parties to this forum, will force them to adopt these measures. That's the idea behind getting an industry man. I can see the intent today, how it progresses in the days to come, we'll all see.

As for OSDD being an institution, the ambition is to be like some institutes in the West that formed the bedrock of biomedical breakthroughs: Scripps Research Institute in the US, Max Planck in Germany or Pasteur Institute in France that have worked with drug companies like Novartis, Hoechst or Sanofi.

Patenting and OSDD are not contradictory: For certain kinds of work or commercialization, there's a way to get around the IP issue but that needs to be built with mutual consent. If you see the graphic, you'll get an idea how several stakeholders are coming together for drug development as it helps de-risk the effort and lowers the cost. The pharma industry doesn't have much choice.

A monumental effort is on, give it some time.
Response to Seema Singh:
Vr Suresh Apr 13, 2012
So CSIR has become selective in patenting? My question is how does one view patenting an effort in the context of open source discovery? If a scientist (with the help of CSIR) gets funding from CSIR for a project and CSIR automatically holds the rights to that patent, what happens to that work? Will it still be made accessible for others to use (like for example, somebody finds a molecule that has antidiabetic activity and CSIR patents it. Will CSIR allow this molecule to be marketed like a generic drug available to the masses if it is found to be suitable for use after testing)? If yes, how will CSIR recover the expenditure from all the testing and research? If not, how is this open source drug discovery? How do TS Balganesh and Brahmachari plan to '€œplug the holes'€ with OSDD resources?


As a mentor for all CSIR drug discovery efforts, Balganesh is positioning OSDD as the de facto '€œapplication'€ platform for the country. €œ"We need to break away from the big pharma mould and try risky routes - look for a big shift in the discovery process,BAD+E222 he says.

Seema Singh said "€œIf you see the graphic, you'll get an idea how several stakeholders are coming together for drug development as it helps de-risk the effort and lowers the cost. The pharma industry doesn't have much choice."€


I guess I am not clear on how getting together with the big pharma companies like Sanofi, Pfizer, Merck and Lilly (if that'€™s what the graphic suggests) will help break away from that mould and shift the discovery process.


Also, what is this preclinical testing innovation centre being built in Mumbai and by whom?


Seema Singh said, "€œA monumental effort is on, give it some time."€

No problem, we live in fast-moving times and change is inevitable. But we, as Indians, must stop being so sheepish and ask more questions about what is done with our money (which is what I am sure CSIR and OSDD get) and the testing that will happen to our population to bring a drug to our markets. Instead of waiting quietly to see the end-product, it is better to ask questions along the way.
Response to Vr Suresh:
Nufail Vkd Apr 14, 2012
I am happy to share you osdd terms and conditions on the contributor's right in our shared document

, https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v
Response to Vr Suresh:
Seema Singh Apr 14, 2012
@VR Suresh: 1) The question you raise has to be viewed in the context of 'affordable health care' and differentiated from 'OSDD'.
Under the affordable health care initiative, which is applicable to all 'diseases' of interest being researched by CSIR labs, the idea is to find new molecules for treatment and making the same available at affordable prices in India. Towards this the strategy is to patent novel knowledge and processes, develop the molecules using CSIR funds (or in collaboration) and license the same (technology/know-how) to appropriate agencies for manufacturing and marketing. Making the license available to multiple manufacturers would create its own market equilibrium thus driving down the prices. CSIR in principle is not funding these programmes, but helps cos generate revenue as it is more important to make sure that the medicine is available to large populations. The ROI is not just the money obtained by licenses but more the economic benefit derived. The licensing strategy would also be driven by the 'disease' and the population it afflicts. (This article gives a better perspective on how CSIR is looking at licensing http://forbesindia.com/article/briefing/csir-goes-for-a-new-patenting-model/24402/1)

On the other hand 'OSSD' is being targeted to 'neglected diseases'- Malaria, TB, Leishmania and Filiariasis. All these diseases afflict large populations, are not the favourite hunting ground for large pharma, and have little chances of significant ROI and above all there is very little incentive in taking risks in investing. The strategy here is that OSDD will make available in the public domain all the data generated through projects funded by OSDD thus obviating the need or the concept of patenting this information. They hope that by opening up the data there will be greater participation and an interest to build on information generated. OSDD does not normally expect any ROI in this category of invention, compounds developed in this process have obviously received public funds, will be licensed to multiple generic manufacturers to help in keeping the prices low; taking into account that the investment into the discovery and development of these compounds have come from public funds and the manufacturers have not taken any risk. This should reduce dramatically the overall investment and risk to manufacturing and marketing and thus drive 'affordability'.
OSDD will respect patents of companies or private owners for compounds if there is an interest to develop the same for neglected diseases in collaboration with OSDD, in such cases the agreement will have to accept exclusive licensing to OSDD for manufacture and marketing in India and other developing countries. Use of the patent and license in developed countries is an option available to the owners of the patent.

2) As for T Balganesh’s appointment, all I know is that the govt has been approaching him for a few years now for leading various institutions/programs. He left AstraZeneca in 2010, when he had 3-4 years of service left, and joined OSDD in Dec 2011. But long before that CSIR DG wanted him to head CDRI and DBT secretary Dr Bhan wanted to him to head THSTI in the upcoming biocluster in the Faridabad.

3.) For more information on the new centre on preclinical work in Mumbai, please contact the director of IIIM in Jammu.
Response to Nufail Vkd:
Vr Suresh Apr 14, 2012
The link you provided doesn't work. Can you give me another link from the OSDD site or perhaps copy and paste relevant sections into your reply?
Response to Seema Singh:
Vr Suresh Apr 14, 2012
Thank you for the information. Although my question mentioned diabetes instead of a disease relevant to OSDD, my intention was to ask about OSDD. But it is helpful to have information about affordable healthcare also.
Response to Vr Suresh:
Osdd Junior Science Forum Apr 15, 2012
"Is this the case or did he retire from Astrazeneca and like all people in India over the age of 60 years get a new lease of employment?"

as per our knowledge Dr Balganesh moved out of AZ when He had a minimum of 2 years of service and where He also had an offer to stay longer
Amit Misra Apr 10, 2012
Nitpick.
The journalist who wrote this piece has got a very small bit wrong. TB drug aerosols will NOT be analogous to ASTHMA inhalers. Asthma drugs are delivered to the upper airways, so that the muscles surrounding these tubes can relax and breathe easy. The most active line of OSDD research in inhaled therapies for TB tries to deliver anti-TB drugs packed in hard, but biodegradable, particles that reach the deepest, innermost recesses of the lungs. As was successfully achieved and commercially abandoned in the case of inhaled Insulin. Further, unlike inhaled insulin, inhaled TB drugs will be formulated to stay in the lungs as far (and as long) as possible, and the 'hard particles' will be picked up by the very cells on the surface of the lungs that TB bacteria invade initially.

Watch the scientific literature for developments on inhaled therapies for TB, to know more about answers to the stupid question: "If TB is primarily a LUNG disease, why is the patient SWALLOWING drugs instead of BREATHING them in?'
Response to Amit Misra:
Seema Singh Apr 14, 2012
@Amit Misra: Thank you for providing the explanation but the idea in the story was not to get into scientific details, i.e. pathways, of how the inhaled drug will be delivered in the body, but to "generally" convey the new modality as you have rightly pointed out.
Sayantan Apr 9, 2012
I am not sure if the crowdsource people can handle this until they are given the knowledge of drug development. The webpage contains lots of big institutions and i wonder how such institutions are helping the crowdsource people.The idea is good but it needs faithful hearts to implement.i have seen the work of osdd closely and i found there are lots of issues need to be resolve. If govt of india spending money on this they should also check out how crowdsource people are helping them.i dont beleive these people are giving the right reports.
Response to Sayantan:
Jinuraj Apr 9, 2012
Dear Sayantan ,
OSDD is an Open forum in that you can also contribute. If the reports are wrong, why cant you contribute to this novel idea? I am a OSDD volunteer researcher working from my house. I am using GARUDA Supercomputing facility provided by OSDD. If you are ready, I will help you to support OSDD project .
1. Can you believe I am working from Pulpally,a remote tribal village in Kerala which is very far away from the city and I am a home based researcher . I could publish my work in international journals like BMC Research Notes in collaboration with CSIR based scientists.
2. Can you point out any of Indian project where a really Science activist can freely participate and contribute other than OSDD?

Jinuraj,
OSDD Research @Home
Pulpally,Wayanad,
Kerala.
Response to Jinuraj:
Sayantan Apr 10, 2012
There are many projects why Indian only where you can participate open notebook science, synaptic leap, and even some computer science projects. Remember the polymath project it was started as a blog. It is not the CSIR's responsible only for doing science. If you love science then you can do research by yourself and publish. There are many places for publishing. Don't tell me village, these days if you have internet connection as some means of transport and electricity then your set to go and start you research.

Some big people using the idea of open science and untilizing us without any benefits at all. The indian govt is raising the food prices each year i earn arounf 8000 rs and all of the money goes to my family . I tried to do open science but i failed because an internet would cost me around 1000 rs and computer would cost me 15000 and most important is time which i cannot give i have to work 10 hours . So keep it on , i would be happy to hear if the crowdsourced people bring some drug to clinical trials rather than a collaborated organization like TB Alliance.
Response to Sayantan:
Satyan P Apr 11, 2012
Sayantan seemed to hail from a breed who willing to wholeheartedly accept without checking whether it works so long as it is not done by India. He likes Synaptic Leap, which existed for years, launched much before OSDD, with hardly any results that OSDD has produce. But OSDD is from India and so he cannot accept it and has different yadsticks for measuring anything Indian.
Response to Sayantan:
Sajeev Rajan Apr 12, 2012
I know in OSDD, several participants are working for a common cause without any financial benefits. Don't discourage us by escalating small problems and I also suggest you to become a part of the crowd and enjoy the way we support Tuberculosis research. (even though it is very small contributions from us).

As a research student I know there are several institutions where they have lot of funds, instruments, book and resourceful persons. The personal ego across the country is limiting the researchers to collaborate each other. So, OSDD gave us a platform to collaborate and utilization of unutilized instrumentations and resources across the country. I am also working from a middle class background with lack of fund. So, please remember that fund is only one of the problems of Indian researcher students.

Our major problem includes resource collaboration useful focus and research leadership. Apart for discovering a molecule. It has started changing Indian research scenario slowly. Those who are sitting in the top of the research may not digest such ideas easily because this may compelled them to reveal their research results and its relevance. I believe OSDD can innovate the way of doing research in the third world work limitations.
Response to Sayantan:
Nufail Vkd Apr 14, 2012
Dear Sayantan

you wrote

"If you love science then you can do research by yourself and publish. There are many places for publishing. Don't tell me village, these days if you have internet connection as some means of transport and electricity then your set to go and start you research."

I agree with your statements

Then who will give you resources ,

in a molecular dynamic problem or docking problem can you do it alone from your pc? . we got such facilities from osdd

say a model bulid in SVM with highly diversed data set from pub chem

can you do it in your individual pc ...no

osdd gave us the way

OSDD opened Garuda ( supercomputing facility OF GOVT of india ) we are firing our jobs from our ordinary lap top or even from the internet cafe . no more power problem , software problem etc
it is working in india
read this blog

http://scienceopenscience.blogspot.in/2011/11/04112011-further-strengthening-mou-was.html?utm_source=BP_recent

please join in osdd group


with regards


nufail
Response to Nufail Vkd:
Sayantab Apr 15, 2012
If i dont earn they who will give me bread i guess not OSDD. I guess the money from osdd should be given to those people like you who are giving your time. I dont even know even if your getting paid or not. For instance i am thinking your not paid then think of a practical situation were you are the only sole earner for you family then this whole scenario changes . Try to think in a practical way. Enough of bureaucratic science and Open source research for India.Its a whole ball game of money dear and i guess the whole drug discovery TB pipleline is not open to all members different people are involved in different research without any communication. Again i will be happy when you guys get paid for open science by govt of india.
Response to Sayantab:
Nufailvkd Apr 15, 2012
your words

"I guess the money from osdd should be given to those people like you who are giving your time?"

let us think this in a different way , I am a researcher and I used to work osdd every day 3-4 hours . I diverted my extra time to osdd . ( hence question of bread do not arise ).

do you know majority of friends and relative wasting 3-4 hrs per day for non productive and non beneficial things

you wrote

"Enough of bureaucratic science and Open source research for India.Its a whole ball game of money dear "

bureaucracy and corruptions , it exist every where in the society . if you are pessimistic it is hard to work in any organization . work hard , become a good leader of the science system without corruption

"i guess the whole drug discovery TB pipleline is not open to all members different people are involved in different research without any communication."

Compare the existing system with osdd . not with the ideal system in your dream . if any improvement ---- then accept otherwise reject

your words

"Again i will be happy when you guys get paid for open science by govt of india."

some of the project assistance and scientist who are selected for a specific purpose to run the system is paid , rest unpaid ( I believe so)
but the resource provided by osdd is more than funding .
1. supercomputing

2 screening of our synthesized molecule for possible anti tb and or anti malarial activity at cdri luknow (in vivo, in vitro, in silico )

3. you tube assistance

4. online doubt clearance , collaborations

5. introduction to real research world and exposure

many more ..........


nufail
Response to Sayantab:
Abhik Apr 15, 2012
Sayatan on certain aspect you are right. I think the science in India is changing day by day. Your posts regarding the criticism of osdd seems to be immature. It is true OSDD people are not paid. But can you tell me when the linux project started how many people get paid or even the Apache or even syanptic leap and open notebook science. It is good that some very potential young researchers are getting into OSDD as project assistants and doing research.
I would certainly say your views are not right at all you must think to do research in an open system is not so easy. I faced several problems and slowly i am overcoming them. It is true if you love science you can start your research anytime ,but also it is true that you might need some sort of guide to do the research. It is true that in OSDD some people are hard to get as guide ,but dr jaleel will help you and even us .
Now its upto you how you want to view OSDD.
Response to Sayantan:
Pushpdeep Apr 15, 2012
At OSDD the goal of the researchers is to work towards new drug for the tropically neglected diseases. Collaborators work day and night, not for any monetary benefits, but to save those thousands of patients who die daily due to Tuberculosis and other tropically neglected diseases which largely affects the poor. Open Science says to contribute as much as one wants for the open research. There are no time limitations; one can work for as less as for few minutes to as long as many hours together. Several Collaborators in the community have used the power of social media, open tools and documents to systematically complete the research projects. This innovative idea of the young researchers has been appreciated worldwide and has inspired many. OSDD Open labs exists for those who have computer and internet problems

The money issued by funding agencies helps to equip the open group with High Performance Computing, Open Classrooms, Virtual Learning, and regular conferences and workshops for the researchers.
Response to Sayantan:
Pushpdeep Apr 15, 2012
Dear Friend, if you want to work full time for OSDD, then apply for the Paid openings when they are announced.

If you have failed in open research before, then communicate to the OSDD community, we all shall help you to collaborate in the open science again.

There is a brighter side beyond the critisizm for open science.
:)

Regards
Pushpdeep
Response to Sayantan:
Dr.sharmila Rao Pn May 8, 2012
Mr.Sayatan,
It is so easy to find fault, can you document who is using you for their means.
I am researching the OSDD so can you tell me what benefits are you not getting?
In what way do you feel cheated? what way do expect the govt. to pander you?
No offence meant but I am curious. By the way I am a doctor practising in a small town, balancing my career, house and doing what ever research I can in my scope.
Response to Jinuraj:
Dr. Sharmila Rao May 8, 2012
I would like to know more about your working how do I get in touch with you
Response to Nufailvkd:
Dr.sharmila Rao May 8, 2012
I appreciate you as I believe in the same things. Glad you have the courage to make the committment.
Ritesh Rathi Apr 9, 2012
Very Insightful Seema. You are really a well researched writer :)
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